Tag Archives: Twitter

Learn Twitter: 10 Intermediate Steps by Ruth Snyder

Twitter-Intermediate1

 

About the Book

Use Twitter to easily and effectively reach your readers!

Successful writers take responsibility for marketing their own work. Social media, including Twitter, can be amazing tools. But how do you get started and use Twitter productively without wasting valuable writing time?

In Learn Twitter: 10 Intermediate Steps, Ruth L. Snyder explains how to go beyond the basics and use Twitter effectively. Using this manual, you’ll learn how to write great tweets, use hashtags, link shorteners, and Twitter tools, schedule your tweets, use tweet templates, and continue building relationships with your worldwide audience. You’ll also discover many tips and tricks to engage your audience and build a solid marketing platform in minutes a day.

This is the second book in the Authors’ Social Media Mastery Series on Twitter. The first book, Learn Twitter: 10 Beginning Steps, helps you master the essentials. This book builds on the basics and helps you learn to make the best use of your Twitter account.

Become more proficient at using Twitter today!

Bonus Content: Video – 10 Steps to Creating Beautiful Graphics with PicMonkey and E-book – Quotes to Use on Twitter (Inspiring Quotes in 140 characters or less)

Book Excerpt

Writing effective tweets can be a challenge. However, there are several things you can do that will make your job easier.

Choose your topic/content

Remember that although your goal may be sales, your focus needs to be on building relationships. Put yourself in your follower’s (prospective customer’s) shoes:

1. What topics is he interested in?
2. What is her felt need?
3. What problem does he want resolved?
4. What makes her laugh? Or cry?

According to Dave Larson (@TweetSmarter), the types of tweets which receive the most engagement are warnings, quotes, trending news, fun quizzes, summaries, tips, and resources. Pictures also increase the chances of your tweet receiving attention.
Shea Bennett (@Sheamus) states only two things count on Twitter: readability and retweetability. He urges that we learn how to differentiate between selling links and selling content:

“…the content is what will sell your product or idea, but nobody is going to care about any of that unless you’ve first sold them the reason to read it. You might have discovered the cure for cancer, but nobody is going to care if you link it next to ‘This is cool.’”

Summarize the topic/information

Summarizing your main point is similar to writing a catchy headline. Jeff Goins (@JeffGoins) says, “Too often the headline is the most neglected part… People just gloss over it without taking much time to consider it. In their minds, it’s the cherry on top. No, friends; it’s not. The headline is the sundae.” He shares this formula: Number or Trigger word + adjective + keyword + promise.

Add a graphic or link

If you’re sharing a quote, a graphic will garner more attention. Donna Moritz (@SociallySorted) has an informative infographic about The Importance of Visual Content. Michael Stelzner of Social Media Examiner (@smexaminer) says, “When you merge the power of imagery with original content, then it gets shared a lot. If you can create some of your own original content, you’ve got more chance of it being shared, versus having to share everybody else’s. It’s very powerful.” If you need more convincing, read How to Use Images to Skyrocket Your Blog Traffic: A Case Study of 100 Million Articles

My favourite apps for creating graphics are WordSwag, Canva, and PicMonkey. (Click here to watch my video about creating beautiful graphics on PicMonkey.) We’ve already discussed how to obtain shortened links using bit.ly.

Writing good tweets takes some practice, so be patient with yourself. Try different formats and topics and see what works best.

Intermediate Step 4 Assignment
Create 5 tweets using the steps outlined in this chapter.
1. Choose a topic
2. Summarize the topic (aim for 80-90 words)
3. Add your link
4. Add an eye-catching graphic

Put all that together and post your tweets. Pay attention to which tweets get the most retweets, favorites, and mentions and write more tweets like those. You may also want to pay attention when you’re reading other people’s tweets. Which ones do you disregard? Why? Which ones do you pay attention to and comment on, favorite, or retweet? Why? This will give you vital information you can put to use when creating your own tweets.
In Chapter 7, we’ll be discussing scheduling your tweets. Once you know which tweets work best, it will be easier to decide which ones to schedule.

 

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About the Author

Ruth L. Snyder spent the first ten years of her life in southern Africa where her parents served as missionaries. In 1977, her family moved to Three Hills, Alberta. She now resides close to Glendon with her husband and five children.

Ruth enjoys writing articles, devotionals, short stories, and Christian fiction. She is a member of The Word Guild and The Christian PEN. Ruth currently serves as the President of InScribe Christian Writers’ Fellowship.

In her spare time, Ruth enjoys reading, crafts, volunteering, photography, and travel. Several years ago, Ruth and her family traveled through 28 States in 30 days!

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